4 cool new projects to try in COPR for July 2018

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

Hledger

Hledger is a command-line program for tracking money or other commodities. It uses a simple, plain-text formatted journal for storing data and double-entry accounting. In addition to the command-line interface, hledger offers a terminal interface and a web client that can show graphs of balance on the accounts.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides hledger for Fedora 27, 28, and Rawhide. To install hledger, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable kefah/HLedger
sudo dnf install hledger

Neofetch

Neofetch is a command-line tool that displays information about the operating system, software, and hardware. Its main purpose is to show the data in a compact way to take screenshots. You can configure Neofetch to display exactly the way you want, by using both command-line flags and a configuration file.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Neofetch for Fedora 28. To install Neofetch, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable sysek/neofetch
sudo dnf install neofetch

Remarkable

Remarkable is a Markdown text editor that uses the GitHub-like flavor of Markdown. It offers a preview of the document, as well as the option to export to PDF and HTML. There are several styles available for the Markdown, including an option to create your own styles using CSS. In addition, Remarkable supports LaTeX syntax for writing equations and syntax highlighting for source code.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Remarkable for Fedora 28 and Rawhide. To install Remarkable, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable neteler/remarkable
sudo dnf install remarkable

Aha

Aha (or ANSI HTML Adapter) is a command-line tool that converts terminal escape sequences to HTML code. This allows you to share, for example, output of git diff or htop as a static HTML page.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides aha for Fedora 26, 27, 28, and Rawhide, EPEL 6 and 7, and other distributions. To install aha, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable scx/aha
sudo dnf install aha
New in Fedora Using Software

12 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    There is error:

    sudo dnf dnf copr enable scx/aha
    ->
    sudo dnf copr enable scx/aha

  2. Ed

    Neofetch is available in the ‘standard’ repo on my machine, although it’s a little behind the copr; 3.4.0 vs 5.0.0

    [root@localhost ~]# uname -a
    Linux localhost.localdomain 4.17.6-200.fc28.x86_64 #1 SMP Wed Jul 11 20:29:01 UTC 2018 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
    [root@localhost ~]# dnf info neofetch
    Last metadata expiration check: 0:19:50 ago on Fri 20 Jul 2018 13:45:11 BST.
    Installed Packages
    Name : neofetch
    Version : 3.4.0
    Release : 1.fc28
    Arch : noarch
    Size : 279 k
    Source : neofetch-3.4.0-1.fc28.src.rpm
    Repo : @System
    From repo : fedora
    Summary : CLI system information tool written in Bash
    URL : https://github.com/dylanaraps/neofetch
    License : MIT
    Description : Neofetch displays information about your system next to an image,
    : your OS logo, or any ASCII file of your choice. The main purpose of Neofetch
    : is to be used in screenshots to show other users what OS/distribution you’re
    : running, what theme/icons you’re using and more.

  3. Phillip B

    neofetch is already in the normal repository??? I have used it for a couple years

  4. Jens Petersen

    The hledger command-line is already in Fedora. 🙂
    We are just one dependency away from being able to package the hledger-web UI too.

  5. Niyas C

    Finally, neofetch is landing on Fedora. I was curious to try it on other distributions, since I saw it on Solus for the first time. I think, it is more colorful comparing to screenfetch

  6. Bruno

    It would be kool if Copr allowed multiple persons to sign the package. It would allow to have a bit more trust into these binaries. Obviously, it is not a absolute insurance, but if multiple persons get the sources, apply some patch and basically redo the same operation, check that they have the same results and sign for it .
    Especially today, with multiple issues with packages including malwares.

  7. Sascha Biermanns

    Hi there!

    Do I miss the point? Neofetch is already in the normal Fedora repository, an easy sudo dnf install neofetch without installing a COPR-repo does the trick. Just checked the server: https://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/fedora/linux/releases/28/Everything/x86_64/os/Packages/n/neofetch-3.4.0-1.fc28.noarch.rpm

    Best regards,

    Sascha

  8. Alejandro

    Nice article, but neofetch is on the Fedora repo. There’s no need to enable COPR repository for it.

    From “dnf info neofetch”:
    Installed Packages
    Name : neofetch
    Version : 3.4.0
    Release : 1.fc28
    Arch : noarch
    Size : 279 k
    Source : neofetch-3.4.0-1.fc28.src.rpm
    Repo : @System
    From repo : fedora
    Summary : CLI system information tool written in Bash
    URL : https://github.com/dylanaraps/neofetch
    License : MIT
    Description : Neofetch displays information about your system next to an image,
    : your OS logo, or any ASCII file of your choice. The main purpose
    : of Neofetch is to be used in screenshots to show other users what
    : OS/distribution you’re running, what theme/icons you’re using and
    : more.

  9. clime

    From Copr, you can get a newer version of neofetch though.

  10. Allen Halsey

    Similar to

    aha

    is the

    ansi2html

    command from the

    python-ansi2html

    package, which is in the Fedora repo.

  11. clime

    It would be kool if Copr allowed multiple persons to sign the package. It would allow to have a bit more trust into these binaries. Obviously, it is not a absolute insurance, but if multiple persons get the sources, apply some patch and basically redo the same operation, check that they have the same results and sign for it .

    I don’t think we need to sign packages per se to indicate the trust in them. But we need or will need a karma-based system in Copr. If anyone is interested in implementing it into Copr, please, let me know at clime@redhat.com.

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