Category

Using Software

Stories, guides, and news for users of Fedora distribution.

Make a DIY digital jukebox: Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of a DIY digital jukebox project. Part 1 of this project addressed how to tweak the system to provide optimal audio performance. With a minimal installation of Fedora Server, the system focused on doing one thing: playing… Continue Reading →

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for December

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can… Continue Reading →

Make Firefox Quantum look native in Fedora 27

You may already know about the introduction of Firefox Quantum in Fedora. Since Quantum brought changes to the extension marketplace, you may wonder how to get it to look like a native Fedora app. Enter client side decoration. This article… Continue Reading →

Fedora Classroom Session: Ansible 101

Fedora Classroom sessions continue this week with an Ansible session. The general schedule for sessions appears on the wiki. You can also find resources and recordings from previous sessions there. Here are details about this week’s session on Thursday, 30th November at 1600 UTC…. Continue Reading →

File better bugs with coredumpctl

An unfortunate fact of life is that all software has bugs, and some bugs can make the system crash. When it does, it often leaves a data file called a core dump on disk. This file contains data about your… Continue Reading →

Build and test applications with Ansible Container

Containers are an increasingly popular development environment. As a developer you have a large choice of tools to manage your containers. This article introduces you to Ansible Container and shows how you can run and test your application in a… Continue Reading →

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for November

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these… Continue Reading →

Try Audacious in Fedora for audio control

Audacious is a simple yet advanced audio player. It focuses on audio quality and supports a spectrum of codecs including FLAC and Vorbis. Though lightweight by design, Audacious provides in-app options like choosing a sound system (PulseAudio, ALSA, JACK, etc.)…. Continue Reading →

Typeset your docs with LaTeX and TeXstudio on Fedora

LaTeX is a document preparation system for high-quality typesetting. It’s often used for larger technical or scientific documents. However, you can use LaTeX for almost any form of publishing. Teachers can edit their exams and syllabi, and students can present… Continue Reading →

Check disk usage at the command line with du

End users and system administrators sometimes struggle to get exact disk usage numbers by folder (directory) or file. The du command can help. It stands for disk usage, and is one of the most useful commands to report disk usage…. Continue Reading →

Getting Started with Flatpak

Fedora is a distribution that does not shy away from emerging technology (after all, one of its founding principles is First). So it comes as no surprise that Fedora is on the leading edge of a revolutionary new software package… Continue Reading →

Using Octave on Fedora 26

Octave is a free alternative to Matlab. It processes numerical computation and offers built-in plotting and visualization tools to evaluate the behavior of formulas and powerful equations. Octave is a multi-platform tool that also contains many scripts compatible with Matlab…. Continue Reading →

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for October

In case you missed last month’s article on COPR, it’s a collection of personal repositories for software not carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may be free software but doesn’tmeet other Fedora standards…. Continue Reading →

Troubleshooting SELinux

SELinux is one of the most powerful security features in your Fedora system. It’s like a valet key for your computer services, only allowing them to access approved data. SELinux has outgrown its early-days reputation for difficulty. Now it has… Continue Reading →

Running the Fedora kernel regression tests

When a new kernel is released, users often want to know if it’s usable. The kernel has a set of test cases that can be run to help validate it. These tests are run automatically on every successful build. They… Continue Reading →

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