Many communication platforms promise to link people together by video, voice, and data. But almost none of them promise or respect user privacy and freedom to a useful extent.

Ring is a universal communication system for any platform. But it is also a fully distributed system that protects users’ confidentiality. One protective feature is that it doesn’t store users personal data in a centralized location. Instead, it decentralizes this data through a combination of OpenDHT and Ethereum blockchain technology. In addition to being distributed, it has other unique features for communication:

  • Cross platform (works on Linux, Windows, MacOS, and Android)
  • Uses only free and open source software
  • Uses standard security protocols and end-to-end encryption
  • Works with desktop applications (like GNOME Contacts)

In July the Savoir-faire Linux team released the stable 1.0 version of Ring. Although it isn’t included in Fedora due to some of its requirements, the Savoir-faire team graciously provides a package for the Fedora community.

How to install Ring

To install, open a terminal and run the following commands:

sudo dnf config-manager --add-repo https://dl.ring.cx/ring-nightly/fedora_26/ring-nightly.repo
sudo dnf install ring

If you’re using an older version of Fedora, or an entirely different platform, check out the download page.

How to setup a RingID

Now that it’s installed, you’re ready to create an account (or link pre-existing one). The RingID allows other users to locate and contact you while still protecting your privacy. To create one:

  1. First, click on Create Ring Account.
  2. Next, add the required information.
  3. Finally, click Next.

The tutorial page offers more information on setting up this useful app. For example, you can learn how to secure your account and add devices which all notify you on a call. To learn more, check out the tutorial page.