Tag

Security

Troubleshooting SELinux

SELinux is one of the most powerful security features in your Fedora system. It’s like a valet key for your computer services, only allowing them to access approved data. SELinux has outgrown its early-days reputation for difficulty. Now it has… Continue Reading →

Easy backups with Déjà Dup

Welcome to part 3 in the series on taking smart backups with duplicity. This article will show how to use Déjà Dup, a GTK+ program to quickly back up your personal files. Déjà Dup is a graphical frontend to Duplicity…. Continue Reading →

How to use Java and other NPAPI plugins in Firefox

Mozilla decided to stop supporting NPAPI plugins for Firefox browser two years ago. NPAPI plugins are binary components integrated to the browser. Some well known NPAPI plugins are Flash, Java, and the GNOME Shell web extension. The stock Firefox 52 browser… Continue Reading →

Using the YubiKey4 with Fedora

A YubiKey is a hardware authentication device that can be used for various one-time password (OTP) and authentication methods. This article explains some of the ways to use the the YubiKey4 with Fedora. Other versions may be incompatible or require… Continue Reading →

What’s new in 389 Directory Server 1.3.5

As a member of the 389 Directory Server (389DS) core team, I am always excited about our new releases. We have some really great features in 1.3.5. However, our changelogs are always large so I want to just touch on… Continue Reading →

How to encrypt your Fedora file system

What is encryption? In cryptography, encryption is encoding information so that only authorized parties can read it. Encryption doesn’t necessarily prevent someone else from getting access to your data. However, if they do, it can prevent that data’s content from being read. Encryption… Continue Reading →

Siddharth Sharma: How do you Fedora?

We recently interviewed Siddharth Sharma on how he uses Fedora. This is part of a series on the Fedora Magazine where we profile Fedora users and how they use Fedora to get things done. If you are interested in being… Continue Reading →

Open source SSH clients

The Secure Shell (SSH) protocol allows users to connect remotely to a machine using encrypted communications. It’s normal to use this protocol to work in a network environment. In Fedora, you can use the default client for SSH connections, OpenSSH…. Continue Reading →

Fedora’s not DROWNing

In the continuing line of security vulnerabilities with cute names like Heartbleed or Shellshock, today we have “DROWN.”

Stickers, Metrics, Security, and More — it’s Five Things in Fedora This Week

Fedora is a big project, and it’s hard to keep up with everything. This series highlights interesting happenings in five different areas every week. It isn’t comprehensive news coverage — just quick summaries with links to each. Get Fedora Stickers… Continue Reading →

GPG key management, part 2

Welcome back to the GPG series, where we are exploring how to make use of GPG with other applications to secure and protect your data. In the first installment, we covered the functions of GPG. You learned about integrity, non-repudiation… Continue Reading →

GPG: Using Your Key

Welcome back to the GPG series, where we explore how to make use of GPG with other applications to secure and protect your data. In the first installment, we covered the functions of GPG. You learned about integrity, non-repudiation and… Continue Reading →

GPG key management, part 1

Welcome back to the GPG series, where we are exploring how to make use of GPG with other applications to secure and protect your data.This installment will cover key creation, key revocation certificate creation, and sending the public key to… Continue Reading →

GPG: a Fedora primer

GPG, or GnuPG, refers to the Gnu Privacy Guard utility. GPG is a freely available implementation of the OpenPGP standard that was released by Werner Koch in 1999. The security and privacy of data and individuals is an important topic in modern culture. The… Continue Reading →

OpenSSH vulnerability could expose private credentials

There’s nothing as jarring for a sysadmin as seeing this kind of message on a mailing list: This is the most serious bug you’ll hear about this week: the issues identified and fixed in OpenSSH are dubbed CVE-2016-0777 and CVE-2016-0778…. Continue Reading →

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