How to rebase to Fedora 33 on Silverblue

Silverblue is an operating system for your desktop built on Fedora. It’s excellent for daily use, development, and container-based workflows. It offers numerous advantages such as being able to roll back in case of any problems. If you want to update to Fedora 33 on your Silverblue system, this article tells you how. It not only shows you what to do, but also how to revert things if something unforeseen happens.

Prior to actually doing the rebase to Fedora 33, you should apply any pending updates. Enter the following in the terminal:

$ rpm-ostree update

or install updates through GNOME Software and reboot.

Rebasing using GNOME Software

The GNOME Software shows you that there is new version of Fedora available on the Updates screen.

Fedora 33 is available

First thing you need to do is to download the new image, so click on the Download button. This will take some time and after it’s done you will see that the update is ready to install.

Fedora 33 is ready for installation

Click on the Install button. This step will take only a few moments and then you will be prompted to restart your computer.

Restart is needed to rebase to Fedora 33 Silverblue

Click on Restart button and you are done. After restart you will end up in new and shiny release of Fedora 33. Easy, isn’t it?

Rebasing using terminal

If you prefer to do everything in a terminal, than this next guide is for you.

Rebasing to Fedora 33 using terminal is easy. First, check if the 33 branch is available:

$ ostree remote refs fedora

You should see the following in the output:

fedora:fedora/33/x86_64/silverblue

Next, rebase your system to the Fedora 33 branch.

$ rpm-ostree rebase fedora:fedora/33/x86_64/silverblue

Finally, the last thing to do is restart your computer and boot to Fedora 33.

How to roll back

If anything bad happens—for instance, if you can’t boot to Fedora 33 at all—it’s easy to go back. Pick the previous entry in the GRUB menu at boot, and your system will start in its previous state before switching to Fedora 33. To make this change permanent, use the following command:

$ rpm-ostree rollback

That’s it. Now you know how to rebase Silverblue to Fedora 33 and roll back. So why not do it today?

FAQs and Guides Using Software

11 Comments

  1. Thanks for the article. I upgraded yesterday and it was very smooth, but I had to remove the rpmfusion to be able to do the rebase:

    rpm-ostree rebase fedora:fedora/33/x86_64/silverblue –uninstall=rpmfusion-nonfree-release-32-1.noarch –uninstall=rpmfusion-free-release-32-1.noarch

    Using those parameters, everything was fine.

  2. Dmitriy

    $ ostree remote refs fedora
    do not work for me:

    ostree remote refs fedora

    Usage:
    ostree remote refs [OPTION…] NAME

    List remote refs

    Help Options:
    -h, –help Show help options

    Application Options:
    –repo=PATH Path to OSTree repository (defaults to current directory or /sysroot/ostree/repo)
    –cache-dir Use custom cache dir
    -v, –verbose Print debug information during command processing
    –version Print version information and exit

    error: Command requires a –repo argument
    Any help?

    • It looks like your fedora remote is named differently.

      Could you try

      ostree remote list

      ?

      • Dmitriy

        Thanks but no:
        ostree remote list
        Usage:
        ostree remote list [OPTION…]

        List remote repository names

        Help Options:
        -h, –help Show help options

        Application Options:
        –repo=PATH Path to OSTree repository (defaults to current directory or /sysroot/ostree/repo)
        -u, –show-urls Show remote URLs in list
        -v, –verbose Print debug information during command processing
        –version Print version information and exit

        error: Command requires a –repo argument

        • Look in the

          /etc/ostree/remotes.d

          You should find the remotes available there.

          Could you also try running

          cat /etc/os-release | grep PRETTY_NAME

          to check what version of Fedora you are exactly running.

  3. leslie Satenstein

    Nice explanation about work done. Thank you

  4. Ian

    Apologies for the stupid question, I’m not a techhead. I’m assuming this process does not convert any ext4 partitions to btrfs? Is there a way to do that, other than a clean install?
    Thanks,

    • When I converted my Silverblue system to BTRFS, I chose rsync to backup my home to an external storage device. I then did a fresh install and used rsync to restore my home. There is an ext4 to btrfs conversion tool included with the btrfs utilities, but it is currently considered experimental and the general consensus I found was it would be a bad idea.

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