Contribute at the Kernel and IoT edition Fedora test days

Fedora Kernel 5.9 Test Week

Fedora test days are events where anyone can help make sure changes in Fedora work well in an upcoming release. Fedora community members often participate, and the public is welcome at these events. If you’ve never contributed to Fedora before, this is a perfect way to get started.

There are two upcoming test days in the upcoming week. The first, starts on Monday 13 April through Monday 20 April, is to test the Kernel 5.6. Wednesday April 15, the test day is focusing on Fedora 32 IoT Edition. Come and test with us to make the upcoming Fedora 32 even better. Read more below on how to do it.

Kernel test week

The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.6. This version was just recently released and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version will also be the shipping kernel for Fedora 32. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week for Monday, April 13 through Monday, April 20. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. This document clearly outlines the steps.

Fedora IoT Edition test day

Fedora Internet of Things is a variant of Fedora focused on IoT ecosystems. Whether you work on a home assistant, industrial gateways, or data storage and analytics, Fedora IoT provides a trusted open source platform to build on. Fedora IoT produces a monthly rolling release to help you keep your ecosystem up-to-date. The IoT and QA teams will have this test day for on Wednesday, April 15. Refer to the wiki page for links and resources to test the IoT Edition.

How do test days work?

A test day is an event where anyone can help make sure changes in Fedora work well in an upcoming release. Fedora community members often participate, and the public is welcome at these events. If you’ve never contributed before, this is a perfect way to get started.

To contribute, you only need to be able to download test materials (which include some large files) and then read and follow directions step by step.

Detailed information about both test days are on the wiki pages above. If you’re available on or around the days of the events, please do some testing and report your results.

Fedora Contributor Community Fedora Project community

7 Comments

  1. wee

    when fedora on PineWatch?

  2. Artur

    You have my sword … 🙂

  3. will definitely test it

  4. Vernon Van Steenkist

    Ironic that Fedora dropped x86 32 bit support and now wants to develop an IOT kernel.

    In my opinion, Fedora is far too bloated for Internet of things. OpenWrt is much more suited for IOT. It can run in devices with 32 megabytes of RAM and 4 megabytes of disk space (A5-V11/MIFI 3g/4G Mini Router for example – around $5 on AliExpress). Plus OpenWrt supports many more hardware platforms than Fedora.

    What can you do with such a small device? Well, for one thing, it can act as a UPnP/DLNA server putting videos, music and photos automagically on your local lan with capacity only limited by how large a flash or USB hard drive you want to plug into to it. Note that most smart TVs have UPnP DLNA clients built in and VLC is a UPnP/DLNA client as well. It can also run ssh, nfs, http, samba servers and useful tools like nmap while only pulling 200ma.

    • Peter Hansen

      @Vernon Van Steenkist

      I think you misunderstood IOT in this context here. Fedora IOT is mainly targeted at single-board computers like Raspberry Pi, Pine 64 Plus or Fitlet2. They feature SOC with ARM processors – that has nothing to do with dropping 32 bit kernel support for x86 archicture.

      On another note, devices with 4/32 MB are not supported by current Openwrt anymore.

      • Vernon Van Steenkist

        You are correct. I didn’t make myself clear. What I should have said is it is Ironic that Fedora dropped x86 32 bit support and now wants to develop an IOT kernel since most single board computers are 32 bit including every Raspberry PI model except the Pi 4.

        Engineering is about doing things with the lowest cost hardware, lowest power consumption and lowest resource usage. My point is that you can do many many IOT projects with very small single board computers like the A5-V11/MIFI 3g/4G Mini Router with at least 10 times lower cost and at least 15 times lower power consumption than any board Fedora is targeting. Why would you want to do a project less efficiently?

        It’s not clear to me what IOT projects Fedora thinks require 64 bit processors with 1GB of RAM. I could have missed it but I didn’t see anything on their IOT documentation page.

        With regard to OpenWrt, they provide an Image Builder with which you can easily create images that can still fit in 4/32 MegaByte devices.

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