Fedora is a big project, and it’s hard to keep up with everything. This series highlights interesting happenings in five different areas every week. It isn’t comprehensive news coverage — just quick summaries with links to each. Here are the five things for April 3rd, 2015:

Google Summer of Code update (mentors wanted!)

This year, we have almost 60 students with proposals to work on various parts of Fedora as part of the Google-sponsored Summer of Code 2015. This is clearly awesome. Unfortunately, we don’t have nearly that many mentors; if you’re interested in helping a student get involved with Fedora (and the world of open source at large!), please send a message to our summer-coding mailing list.

Flock 2015 registration is open

Last week, I mentioned that talk submissions and hotel reservations are open for Flock, our big annual planning and contributors’ conference. But I missed that pre-registration for the conference is also open! If you’re involved in making Fedora, or would like to be, please join us this August 12-15 in Rochester, NY. Visit the registration page and add your name and information!

Fedora 22 schedule update

Just a quick note: Fedora 22 continues to be on track as we move into the “freeze” phase for the beta release scheduled for two weeks from now. At this point, all of the accepted major changes should be complete and ready to test (leading to, of course, a perfect final release in May).

Awesome Fedora.next post from Paul Frields

Former FPL and current Fedora Engineering Manager Paul Frields wrote a great piece entitled Fedora Under Construction?. It gives a look at what’s going on with the “Fedora.next” ideas for the future of Fedora, including a look at some exciting, big ways we might put the distribution together differently over the course of the next few releases. Please join in the conversation and help us figure this out.

Update to package branch creation process

And finally, a quick note for Fedora packagers… while the process for getting a new package accepted into the distribution still has a lot of steps, the Fedora engineering team is working to automate many of the previously-manual steps, and Pierre-Yves Chibon (better known to many of us as pingou) announced an improvement to the process of creating a new branch — that is, a “home” for the package in a new Fedora version (or in Fedora EPEL, the Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux). That’s necessary when adding a completely new package, or when you want to expand your package’s availability.

So, for users, not a big deal, but if you’re a packager, one small improvement, and a change worth knowing about.