Author

Laura Abbott

Running the Fedora kernel regression tests

When a new kernel is released, users often want to know if it’s usable. The kernel has a set of test cases that can be run to help validate it. These tests are run automatically on every successful build. They… Continue Reading →

Changing Fedora kernel configuration options

Fedora aims to provide a kernel with as many configuration options enabled as possible. Sometimes users may want to change those options for testing or for a feature Fedora doesn’t support. This is a brief guide to how kernel configurations… Continue Reading →

How to install a kernel from koji

Kernel developers frequently request bug reporters test on a different kernel. Sometimes this is a full new version. Other times it’s a test build with a patch. This article shows you how to install a kernel someone has built elsewhere.

Closing bugs as end-of-life

Each Fedora release is supported for a given time period. Approximately one month after Fedora release X+2, Fedora release X will go end of life (sometimes called EOL). Fedora 25 was recently released, so Fedora 23 will be going end… Continue Reading →

Kernel 4.9 merge window highlights

The 4.8 kernel was released on October 2nd. This also marked the start of the merge window for the 4.9 kernel. The merge window is the time period when kernel subsystem maintainers send their pull requests for new features to be… Continue Reading →

Building the Fedora Kernel

Whether it’s curiosity or testing a patch, there are lots of reasons for compiling a kernel. This is a brief tutorial for compiling a kernel for Fedora. Getting started with the kernel The Fedora kernel is just another package in… Continue Reading →

Getting involved with the Fedora kernel

There are countless ways to contribute to open source projects like Fedora. Perhaps one of the most obvious ways to contribute is by helping with the Linux kernel in Fedora. At Flock 2016, I gave a talk about the state… Continue Reading →

What makes up the Fedora kernel?

Every Fedora system runs a kernel. Many pieces of code come together to make this a reality. Each release of the Fedora kernel starts with a baseline release from the upstream community. This is often called a ‘vanilla’ kernel. The… Continue Reading →

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