Fedora Magazine http://fedoramagazine.org Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:54:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Call for applications for Fedora Diversity Advisor (A Volunteer Position) http://fedoramagazine.org/call-for-applications-for-fedora-diversity-advisor-a-volunteer-position/ http://fedoramagazine.org/call-for-applications-for-fedora-diversity-advisor-a-volunteer-position/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:54:25 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9401 Continue Reading →]]> Fedora is a big community that includes contributors and users from many different countries, each with their own experiences and historical backgrounds that contribute to a diverse mix of cultural, educational, and behavioral norms. To continuously create and foster an inclusive environment in the Fedora community, it’s important to respond to the needs of existing contributors and users, and welcome new contributors and users from diverse backgrounds.

The Fedora Diversity Advisor Search team for the Fedora Council is looking for a Fedora Diversity Advisor (a volunteer position) to act as a source of support and information for all contributors and users, especially those from underrepresented populations, so that issues of inclusion and equity can be discussed and addressed with the planning of multiculturalism and comfort.

Primary responsibilities

  • Implement diversity efforts that will have a big effect on the Fedora community
  • Promote inclusion in the Fedora community
  • Act as a source of support and a mediator should there be any
    concerns or incidents
  • Serve on the Fedora Council, our top-level governance and leadership body

To achieve the above you will work with Fedora community members to identify which of the following and other strategies would be most effective and feasible, and help implement them:

  • Increasing visibility of minority contributors and users through
    talks, feature articles, and awards
  • Making explicit invitations and providing financial support to
    attend conferences and give talks
  • Helping develop skills by offering targeted workshops and internships
  • Creating a welcoming environment by adopting and enforcing codes of
    conduct
  • Fostering communication, networking, and support forums with mailing
    lists and in-person events

Required skills

  • Knowledge of and experience in working with historically
    underrepresented groups
  • Excellent written communications skills, demonstrated through blog
    posts or other written work
  • Understanding of and experience in open source communities
  • Ability to communicate at a moderate technical level about open
    source projects
  • Experience in similar roles in your past is a significant advantage
  • Experience writing grants is a plus.

To apply for the position, please answer the following questions and send your responses and a CV (or link to your online profile) to diversity-app@lists.fedoraproject.org

  • Why do you believe diversity and inclusion are important for Fedora?
  • Why do you want to serve as Fedora’s Diversity & Inclusion Advisor?
  • What specific minority group(s) or issues can you offer insight about?
  • What perspectives, experiences, or knowledge about diversity and inclusion
    could you share with the Fedora community?
  • Do you have experience working across various cultures? (Cross cultural
    refers to various geographies, cultural groups, etc.)
  • To give us further insight, feel free to provide names and contact
    information for up to three people who can speak to your passion,  interest
    or experience with diversity and inclusion.

NOTE: Last date of submission of application is July 31, 2015. Also, this is a volunteer position and NOT a paid position.

Looking forward to a great participation.

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FESCo Elections Interview with Dennis Gilmore (ausil) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-dennis-gilmore-ausil/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-dennis-gilmore-ausil/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:53 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9343 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Dennis Gilmore (ausil)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I started with fedora way back in fedora.us as a packager, I got involved in Fedora infrastructure when we had 3 servers and half a dozen builders. Over the years I have been on FESCo and the project board, I worked with Mike McGrath to start EPEL. Worked with Tom Callaway to start Fedora Secondary arches. Currently I am the lead for Fedora Release Engineering and am working to enable us to more flexibly deliver Fedora and making sure that Fedora can grow and embrace the changing IT landscape.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

I think we have to have a compromise of sorts. I would like to see us work on time based landing of features,  regular points in time where we can talk about new things delivered to users in stable trees, but I would like to see us move more to a series of rolling releases.
The ultra stable series where we land things occasionally, mostly it is bug fixes kinda like Fedora n-1 today. where it is stable and solid but every six months or so we push a new set of rock solid bigger changes out to it, this is what I would install for my mum.
Then we have the stable series which is like fedora releases today. Stable and solid but slightly more change and allow people try out new things sooner.There would be new features more often. Maybe every 3-6 months we promote changes to stable. The user here would be someone tech savy who wants the latest cool things but does not want to deal with a firehose of updates and doesn’t want to deal with some pieces being unpolished and a bit rough.
Finally we would have a development tree, where we land new features  regularly. Changes would get isolated and tested some before landing,  this is where Fedora developers should live, it would not eat babies and kill kittens. But be somewhere that we can land the latest GNOME or KDE and get testing. New features could land any time. Sometimes there is polish that needs to happen, but for the most part everything should work okay.
On top of the development tree we would have env and stacks where people can experiment and try out radically new things.  When they are deemed stable enough for general consumption they get folded into development.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

The biggest pressing issue is keeping up with the rapidly changing IT landscape. The traditional IT model will stay around and will continue to need to be supported, but we need to embrace new ways to build, and ship software. We need to try the new thing that comes along, we need to drive the new thing that comes along, we need to be willing to go that did not work and drop it.  We should not continue to offer things that make no sense anymore.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I play American football, it helps me to keep focused and follow a plan.  I also like photography and showing my daughter the world around us.

Anything else voters should know?

I am extremely passionate about Fedora I love doing what I do. I want to make sure it succeeds and is always deliverable.  I am working to change as Fedora and the IT world changes, and ensuring no one ever says again that “Release Engineering” is a black box.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

There are many many parts of Fedora that do not do a great job in communicating. I do not have a bullet answer to fix that, but it is an area that needs to be addressed. Not just FESCo but many other parts of Fedora.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

Help to ensure that Fedora embraces change, but makes sure we do not Run before we walk.  Given my job I can do some of that without being on FESCo but it would be easier within FESCo and hopefully can ensure that we avoid conflict by ensuring there is better communication and visibility into the release engineering side of Fedora.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

I do not think that the council greatly changes the significance of FESCo. If anything it enhances and gives FESCo somewhere to be accountable to. The way things were before the Board was completely hands off in the engineering side. Now the Council can set long term goals, FESCo can set the short term goals to achieve them and they can work well together for the benefit of Fedora.

Do you think FESCo can help with the reduction of the backlog of >400 packages awaiting review?

FESCo can help by looking at the processes and work to eliminate bottlenecks. By working with QA to get better automated testing setup we can look at automating parts of the review process, and simplify things overall without sacrificing the quality of Fedora.

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FESCo Elections Interview with David King (amigadave) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-david-king-amigadave/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-david-king-amigadave/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:52 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9341 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with David King (amigadave)

dave_speaker_profile

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I work for Red Hat in the desktop team, contributing to Fedora as a GNOME and MinGW packager, as well as an upstream GNOME contributor.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

Six month release cycles that sync up with upstream projects seem to work well at getting upstream code into the hands of users quickly, for the workstation product, at least. The cloud product would probably benefit from a more frequent release timetable, for example.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

Figuring out how much (or little) differentiation will be possible between the different products is going to be interesting over the next few cycles. Additionally, finding a solution to the tide of updates to stable releases is an ongoing task.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I maintain several GNOME modules upstream, and occasionally write user and developer documentation. I have a broad background as a developer in Free Software, so I help out where I can.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

Meetings already happen in public, with full logs available, so the communication is at least transparent. There is always room for improvement, but I do not think that there are serious communication deficiencies.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

Taking part in FESCo meetings, and voting on Fedora engineering decisions, mostly.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

FESCo is a technical committee to steer the technical direction of Fedora, while Fedora Council is the body responsible for overall community governance, so the significance and scopes are different.

Do you think FESCo can help with the reduction of the backlog of >400 packages awaiting review?

In the same way as all other Fedora packagers, yes, by reviewing review requests.

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Env and Stacks Elections Interview with Stuart Campbell (sic) http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-stuart-campbell-sic/ http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-stuart-campbell-sic/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:48 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9326 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of Env and Stacks Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Stuart Campbell (sic)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I have been a long time user of Fedora since it’s inception and before that Red Hat Linux since about 4.1 – which really is starting me make me feel old! :)
Recently, I was one of the inaugural members of  the Environment and Stacks Working Group.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

In my day job, I work at a large scale scientific facility, where we use computing to try and lower the barrier to scientific discovery. This can involve taking on a number of different roles from systems administrator, architect/integrator, software developer and scientist. The foundation for all the platforms we use is either RHEL/CentOS or Fedora. I have spent a lot of time and effort working with how to deploy the latest cutting edge scientific software on platforms that move at a slower timescale. I think that this real world experience of trying to use Fedora for use cases that are covered by this working group will add a useful perspective. I also work on some open source scientific software that have a large number of package dependencies. So I have had a lot of experience (and pain) of various approaches to what you do when the software you need to deploy has dependencies that are either not met (not too bad) or conflict with versions shipped in the base os (not fun).

What are your Future plans ? Is there anything what you can consider as “Mission Statement” in this role?

At a high level, I would like to help Fedora become the Linux distribution of choice for developers and advanced users.  But, closer to home, I would like to help the Fedora Project develop a robust and coherent approach to the use of newer/conflicting package stacks (e.g. different versions of python or httpd than that shipped with the base os) through to user level package management and the maintenance of language stacks (e.g. Python, Ruby, etc).

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today? What should we do about them?

I think that one of the biggest hurdles for Fedora is to try and change the general perception from a large portion of users that it is just too fast moving and therefore too unstable to use for general day to day purposes.  I think that the Fedora.Next initiative was an excellent concept and led to a focused approach to develop a coherent product / flavour (i.e. Workstation, Server, Cloud) and which has culminated in the excellent Fedora 22 release.

What interests you from Env and Stacks, and which projects would you contribute to?

I think that Fedora needs to have a coherent approach to how we deal with packages that make up the core OS and those that can be ‘switched out’ with newer or different versions, all the way up to user level package management.  In this area I think that the Aleph proposal from Nick Coghlan is an excellent start to try and develop a project wide approach and I would like to help him make it a reality.

I have also been looking at how we could extend copr in order to allow users to generate a docker container with all their copr packages included.

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FESCo Elections Interview with Josh Boyer (jwboyer) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-josh-boyer-jwboyer/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-josh-boyer-jwboyer/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:45 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9342 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Josh Boyer (jwboyer)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I’ve used Fedora since it was created, and have participated as a contributor since the Fedora Core 4 time frame.  I’ve been a packager and package sponsor.  I’ve been on rel-eng, FESCo, the Board, the Workstation WG, and the Council.  I am currently one of the Fedora kernel maintainers, and a FESCo and Council member.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

I think it should be either time based or feature driven, but not some compromise in between.  We’ve tried that before and it didn’t work well.  Feature driven is clear on the content and what we need to wait for.  Time driven make it easier from a user expectation point of view.  Right now FESCo is going with time driven and I’d like to see us stick with that for a few releases.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

We need to carry forward the moment that Fedora 21 and the Edititions change started.  We received a lot of good reviews and feedback on this approach, and I would like to see us continue to make Fedora a more complete and well integrated OS out of the box instead of just a collection of packages.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I enjoy playing hockey among other things.  My outside interests really have nothing to do with technology as I spend most of my day working on that already.  I suppose that will help me take time away from complex or stressful issues and be able to approach them with a clear head.

Anything else voters should know?

Please vote.  Without active contributors and voters, elections are somewhat pointless.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

FESCo is doing better than it was.  I’d like to see a more proactive approach in reaching out to Change owners and making sure they’re available when their Change is being discussed.  Beyond that, it really depends on the topic or issue at hand.  I think things are going fairly well from a FESCo standpoint.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

I’ve answered this question the same way for a long time, and the answer is “not much.”  FESCo is a collection checkpoint for items coming into the OS as a whole, so it is unique in that aspect.  Beyond that, there are policy changes to review or create but those are fairly infrequent.  Other than items like those, you don’t need to be on FESCo to do most of the various activities in Fedora, and I’d point out that sometimes being on FESCo can actually make you less productive in certain ways because it can take a lot of time.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

I think FESCo has been and still remains the primary Engineering/Technical committee in Fedora.  The Council will lean on them heavily to understand technical issues and recommend proper solutions or approaches.

Do you think FESCo can help with the reduction of the backlog of >400 packages awaiting review?

No.  FESCo has no solution to that problem, nor do they have resources they can direct at it.  It will take people stepping up to do the reviews.  There has been discussion on automating via tooling, and that is something that might help but it isn’t something FESCo is actively working on.  It still requires interested people to do the work.

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FESCo Elections Interview with Haïkel Guémar (hguemar) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-haikel-guemar-hguemar/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-haikel-guemar-hguemar/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:43 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9340 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Haïkel Guémar (hguemar)

me

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I have been in the project for nine years, I’m currently provenpackager/sponsor, ambassador and part of the Cloud WG. I was part of the last Fedora Board and partly responsible of the creation to the Fedora Council.
I’m also part of the CentOS Cloud SIG where I lead the Openstack packaging effort.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

We’re living in a fast-moving world, I’m not against reconsidering the schedule but I’d rather release more often than the contrary. I’m leaning toward keeping the current 6 months schedule and make Rawhide a more usable alternative to advanced users.
On the other hand, I would very like see Fedora Products (namely Server and Workstation) offer long term releases (2 years ?) to suit the needs of our community. That means adapting our infrastructure and getting more contributors helping out.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

Fossilization.

Fedora has been a great place to innovate and doing the right things, but we’ve slowly trapped ourselves in our own processes. Our infrastructure is also dealing with its own history and limited resources. The difficulty is to evolve without losing our DNA, I don’t want to compromise with our foundations.
FESCo should encourage the various engineering groups to be more daring and supervise their work and interactions. We need to simplify processes without compromising with our quality.

Self-hosting

Since the beginning, Fedora has made a lot of effort to remain self-hosted, but the new collaborative platforms has changed that. Now, a lot of projects are mainly hosted on github, tasks managed through trello etc. We need to provide better collaborative tools to our contributors and not be tied to proprietary platforms. One of the Fedora Infrastructure, I have biggest hopes is Progit which is a sane collaborative code hosting platforms.
I’m afraid that FESCo has little influence on that topic and that should be addressed by Fedora Council.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I have been staff representative and I have proven being quite “obstinate” at defending my peers and ethics My $DAYJOB is software engineer dealing with cloudy technologies and I’m an agile methodologies/software craftsmanship expert. As an “agile” monkey, I have experience in identifying and fixing bottlenecks/impediments to improve the overall workflow.
I have few hobbies but none is really relevant for Fedora.

Anything else voters should know?

Why am I applying to FESCo? I think that current FESCo members do their work pretty well, but it’s lacking diversity and new blood. I don’t think that I am better than any of the other candidates but I have a different perspectives and it could be valuable. Especially my experience at CentOS, may help bridging the two communities.

My favourite Dr Sheldon Cooper quote is “I’m not insane my mother had me tested” (Just checking if people are actually reading this).

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

Definitively, FESCo is the technical leadership of Fedora and it should be able to reach a far larger audience. Many contributors have little knowledge on FESCo and what it does, it needs to be fixed.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

Address pain points, improve contributors life effectively.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

As one of the persons who led the governance change, running for FESCo should be enough proving that I do believe that FESCo is still relevant. FESCo is still an important body of Fedora leadership, as it participates to the council through the Fedora Engineering representative (currently Josh Boyer).

Do you think FESCo can help with the reduction of the backlog of >400 packages awaiting review?

Yes, as the problem is that our reviewing process doesn’t scale as that falls under FESCo reserved domain. But it’s unlikely to change as there’s no consensus in how to fix that issue. I could try leading a consultation on Fedora devel and come up with few proposals to FESCo to remove bottlenecks. So the only way to get this sorted is to encourage packagers to do more reviews, and I expect that provenpackagers and sponsors shows the way. In my own opinion, sponsors/provenpackagers that have not reviewed any packages in the last two years, should be removed from these groups. Since fedora-review, reviewing packages is much less painful as it was in the past, there are no excuses!

One of the most interesting initiative on that topic is Fedora Review Server.

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Env and Stacks Elections Interview with Nick Coghlan (ncoghlan) http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-nick-coghlan-ncoghlan/ http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-nick-coghlan-ncoghlan/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:42 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9333 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of Env and Stacks Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Nick Coghlan (ncoghlan)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I came to Fedora by way of Red Hat, as I became a Fedora KDE Spin user (migrating from Kubuntu) within a few months of starting with Red Hat in June 2011.
My main volunteer involvement with Fedora development has been through the Python SIG, by helping align distro level efforts (such as the Python 3 migration) with the upstream Python community, and by ensuring that the distro perspective is taken into account in upstream design decisions (such as the way the upstream pip bundling was structured to allow for unbundling in the Fedora system package).
My main paid involvement has been aiming to better align automated QE efforts between Fedora upstream and RHEL downstream, including advocating for the establishment of the beaker.fedoraproject.org service as a path towards establishing public automated hardware integration testing in Fedora (rather than continuing to rely on Red Hat’s private Beaker instance), and helping to ensure that analysis tools like rpmgrill are designed in such a way as to be amenable to deployment in Taskotron.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

Directly relevant to my interest in the Environments & Stacks working group is the fact that I’m a current CPython core developer, and responsible for approving new interoperability standards in the Python packaging ecosystem.
Less immediately relevant, but useful as background information, are the fact that I’m a current Director of the Python Software Foundation, have spent the last 4 years working for Red Hat on its “project to product” workflow automation (deploying internal services to RHEL and supporting RHEL and Fedora client systems), and before that spent 12 years working for Boeing Defence Australia as a software developer and system architect.

What are your Future plans ? Is there anything what you can consider as “Mission Statement” in this role?

My main objective in participating in the Environments & Stacks working group has been to help redesign Fedora’s packaging review process to not only meet the needs of operations teams that need to ensure the stability of existing services (as it already does today), but also to meet the needs of development teams that need to rapidly deliver new features and new services in order to meet the needs and expectations of their users.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today? What should we do about them?

I think the most pressing issue facing Fedora is one that faces all current Linux distributions that aren’t exclusively focused on the enterprise data centre: cross-platform open source developers using any languages other than C and C++ tend to view Linux distributions as an obstacle to be worked around rather than as potential allies worth collaborating with.
For many open source developers, using a Linux distro as their personal desktop is currently no friendlier to their preferred workflow than using a proprietary POSIX-inspired operating system like Apple’s Mac OS X (or even a non-POSIX OS like Microsoft Windows), which allows the non-development related aspects of the proprietary ecosystems around the latter platforms to dominate their decision making process.
My draft Aleph proposal at https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Env_and_Stacks/Projects/PackageReviewProcessRedesign represents my suggestion for a possible way forward that retains all of the benefits of the existing review process (thus continuing to meet the needs of operations teams), while introducing new aspects that better account for the interests of developers writing and maintaining rapidly evolving software and services.

What interests you from Env and Stacks, and which projects would you contribute to?

My main focus would be on figuring out how to turn the general concepts of the Aleph proposal into concrete changes to Fedora’s processes and tooling, by way of Fedora’s existing change management process. While I would aim to use the Python software distribution ecosystem as a reference example (as that is both the ecosystem I know best and the one where I have the most influence), I would also aim to ensure that any proposals appropriately accounted for the interests of other software development and distribution ecosystems (including language independent ecosystems like those around nix and conda).

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FESCo Elections Interview with Stephen Gallagher (sgallagh) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-stephen-gallagher-sgallagh/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-stephen-gallagher-sgallagh/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:41 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9339 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Stephen Gallagher (sgallagh)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I’ve been using Fedora since Fedora Core 2 (and prior to that, Red Hat Linux since 5 or 6). I joined as a contributor in 2008 when I was hired by Red Hat. I was one of the original developers of the System Security Services Daemon and worked on that for several years.
I have served on FESCo off and on since 2011 and have worked on several projects in that time, including SSSD, FreeIPA, rolekit, Cockpit and others. I am a member of the Fedora Server Working Group and its current FESCo liaison.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

We’ve tried both in recent memory and neither approach has shown itself to be substantially more beneficial than the other in terms of the quality of what we deliver.
That said, When we switched to a feature-based schedule, we ended up slipping more than we historically had, resulting in disappointment from our users (as we were stuck with many older packages for longer).
Given Fedora’s “First” Foundation, I’m somewhat more in favour of aiming for a time-based schedule in order to try to deliver new functionality to our users faster. I think also it aids in our planning, as if we hold ourselves to our stated time (like we did in Fedora 23), people trust our schedules more and will naturally align with them.
So, I suppose I’m in favour of continuing in Fedora 23 and 24 what we got back to in Fedora 22: a tightly-held time-based schedule and a willingness to defer features that aren’t ready rather than slipping to accommodate them.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

I think our biggest issue in Fedora is being able to adapt quickly to changes. Fortunately, I think we’ve made some great strides in that over the last eighteen months. A lot of the rel-eng and QA tooling work that was done alongside the Fedora.next effort has gotten us closer to an environment where we can make quick course corrections. I think we need to continue to focus on that, especially in the rel-eng space (thinking about Fedora Atomic in particular).

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

My primary interests outside of Fedora (in all its wide and varied meanings) are spending time with my family and reading a good science-fiction or fantasy novel or playing video games. None of these things directly assist me in my FESCo role, but they provide a necessary counter-balance that keeps me mostly sane.

Anything else voters should know?

People often believe that FESCo is a committee of decision-makers, which is true to a point. But it’s also a committee of advocates; people who are representing the needs of the developer community in Fedora. I think it’s important to have representation of all of the “doers” as our former FPL would have called you.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

Communication needs to be a two-way street. I think FESCo generally does a pretty reasonable job of communicating the decisions it makes to the wider community, but I think sometimes that communication is one-sided. Fedorans need to feel more comfortable bringing topics directly to our attention (vs. hoping that we see their valid complaint amidst a flamewar on devel@). I’d like to see more of our community attending the FESCo meetings and piping up (at least during the Open Floor section).

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

FESCo is ultimately where the technical direction of Fedora is set. Without having been on FESCo (and having access to the pulpit that implies), I doubt I could have gotten very far with my original suggestions about delivering Cloud, Server and Workstation Editions. I’m not suggesting that I’m planning to propose anything that drastic again soon, but being on FESCo gives me a certain platform from which to raise big questions and have them given due consideration.
Furthermore, a seat on FESCo will help me accomplish my duties for the Fedora Council, as I am the steward of the three-edition effort there.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

As with any good organization, I think the Council and FESCo form excellent divisions between strategy and tactics. The Council defines the overall strategy of the Fedora Project, but it is not the right body to define the tactics taken to accomplish that strategy. While there may be some overlap of membership, I think it makes complete sense to have them act as separate units.
In short, the Council decides both that we should do something and why we should do it, while it’s FESCo’s job to figure out how and when.

Do you think FESCo can help with the reduction of the backlog of >400 packages awaiting review?

Well, there are many ways to define “reduction”. Certainly, FESCo could wave its collective hands and declare that all packages were [granted|denied], but I assume the question really being asked is “Do you have any ideas for how to streamline the package review process?” (or possibly, “How can we get more people to perform reviews?”)
The first question there is getting better all the time; With tools like fedora-review and fresque in the works, we may be able to get to a point very soon where we may be able to reduce the review requirement to little more than a license check with an automated review. (This is an over-simplification, but I believe that a great deal of review is automatable).
The second question is far more difficult, and it’s a side-effect of having a purely volunteer review group. Obviously, packages that are being produced by Red Hat and other corporate entities tend to get into the package collection faster because those organizations can sponsor the reviews (in one way or another). This is a great deal harder for individual contributors outside of a corporate environment. We probably need to be able to incentivize potential reviewers better; maybe we can take advantage of Badges and fedmsg in some way. Perhaps guarantee the top N reviewers over the last year funding to travel to Flock? Just an idea.

 

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Env and Stacks Elections Interview with Jan Kaluza (jkaluza) http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-jan-kaluza-jkaluza/ http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-jan-kaluza-jkaluza/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:34 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9331 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of Env and Stacks Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Jan Kaluza (jkaluza)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I’m maintainer of various Fedora packages – Apache httpd, Passenger, Logrotate, File, Mailman and others.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I’m working on the micro-webapps project https://github.com/micro-webapps/micro-webapps – The way how to deploy web applications in multi-containers environment (mainly Kubernetes and Openshift). I therefore have practical experience with these projects and can help Fedora with their better adoption.
I’m also the Apache httpd committer, so I have good knowledge of Apache httpd. This can be beneficial when researching new ways how to package and deploy web application and improve the interoperability between webservers used in Fedora.

What are your Future plans ? Is there anything what you can consider as “Mission Statement” in this role?

I would like to research new methods how to deploy software (primarily web applications) in the cloud environment. This includes Atomicapp, Kubernetes and Docker.
The mission statement: Ensure that the Fedora is prepared to be used in the cloud and it is actually easy for developers and users to use it in this environment.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today? What should we do about them?

One of the issue I could help to solve is the lack of progress in the cloud integration. We should start the discussion with Fedora Server working group to find out what are their needs and proactively try to research possible solutions on the Env and Stacks side to make the Fedora Server (and rolekit) successful.

What interests you from Env and Stacks, and which projects would you contribute to?

I’m interested in the new ways how to package and deploy the software. I would like to contribute to “Dockerfile’s recommended practices” and improve it for the web-applications. I would also like to propose new project aimed to multi-container applications in Fedora.

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Env and Stacks Elections Interview with Jens Petersen (petersen) http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-jens-petersen-petersen/ http://fedoramagazine.org/env-stacks-elections-interview-jens-petersen-petersen/#comments Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:00:27 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=9322 Continue Reading →]]> This is a part of Env and Stacks Elections interviews series.
Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on June 22nd and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on June 28th.
Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.
Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Jens Petersen (petersen)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I have been involved in the Fedora Project from the start.
I am an experienced package maintainer, Sponsor, and package SCM admin.
I started the Fedora i18n project and also the Fedora Haskell SIG.
I work for Red Hat and supervise the i18n Software Engineering team.
I maintain many of the Haskell packages in Fedora in my spare time.

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I have been involved in the Haskell community for a long time as a personal interest.  I think it is good to have someone in the WG with experience in a different language than say python/ruby/perl since sometimes other languages may have different packaging and infrastructure requirements.

What are your Future plans ? Is there anything what you can consider as “Mission Statement” in this role?

Modern programming languages tend to have deep stacks with many small libraries which makes packaging and maintaining them in Fedora a real challenge. Copr is a good step forward and containers too, but I feel more can be done to give developers easier access to the latest versions of software stacks. User level package management seems needed for this.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today? What should we do about them?

For me more or less my answer to question 3: ie making it really easy for users to hit the ground running with the latest versions of technologies.  I think containers are also trying to address this.

What interests you from Env and Stacks, and which projects would you contribute to?

There is a lot of interesting things going on in Env and Stacks. I am particularly interested in the development, evolution and giving structure to the Ring 2 packaging playground, and making containers more usable in everyday work.

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