Fedora Magazine http://fedoramagazine.org Fri, 30 Jan 2015 21:59:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Inkscape 0.91 Released, available in Fedora soon http://fedoramagazine.org/inkscape-0-91-released/ http://fedoramagazine.org/inkscape-0-91-released/#comments Fri, 30 Jan 2015 21:59:19 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6937 Inkscape just released version 0.91 of their Open Source vector graphics editor, and the new package will soon be available in the stable repositories for Fedora 21. Inkscape 0.91 is the first major release of Inkscape for a few years, and it has many bugfixes and new features compared to the previous Inkscape 0.48 release.

inkscape

For those not familiar with Inkscape, It is a versatile, feature rich vector graphics editor that can be used for a wide range of tasks, including UI mockups, icons, logos, digital illustration:

car icons-screenshot buildermockups

Inkscape uses the Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format as the primary source filetype, which is getting more and more popular as a format for vector graphics on the web. Inkscape can also export to a wide range of different formats, including PNG and PDF.

Inkscape 0.91 is a huge improvement over the previous 0.48 release, with the inkscape developers fixing hundreds of bugs, introducing a wide range of new tools and features, and also making Inkscape perform much, much better.

 Stability and Performance

The Inkscape developers did a lot of work in this release to improve the performance and stability of Inkscape. I have been using development versions of Inkscape 0.91 for over a year now, and noticed a huge reduction in the number of times Inkscape stalled or crashed during use.

Additionally, Inkscape 0.91 includes a new renderer based on Cairo, which is noticeably faster at rendering complex drawings with lots of SVG filters like blurs, and also caches parts of complex drawings to improve rendering times when editing.

Inkscape now uses threading when rendering filter effects, so users with newer machines with multiple processing cores will notice a difference when rendering complex images. Inkscape also now uses up to 25% less memory on some complex drawings.

 New Features

Inkscape 0.91 delivers a wide range of features that improve and simplify drawing and illustrating in Inkscape.

New measurement tool

0.91 introduces a new tool that allows users to measure the distances and angles between objects in an inkscape drawing by drawing a “ruler” over the objects. Using this tool is super simple, just draw a live over your objects, and the distances and angles will live-update on canvas as you move your mouse

Ruler

Font and Text Improvements

The inkscape developers did a lot of work in the 0.91 release on improving the way users change and update text and fonts in Inkscape.

Inkscape now also warns you when you open an SVG file that uses fonts that you don’t have installed on your system, and lets you substitute them for other fonts that you do have installed.

The text toolbar now shows a list of the fonts that are currently used in a document at the top of the font chooser drop-down, and in the font chooser dialog:

textshortlist2

The different variants for fonts (Medium, Thin, Bold, etc) can now be set both in the font chooser dialog and the text toolbar:

fontvariants

 Finding and moving objects

Inkscape 0.91 introduces a bunch of new features that make it easier to find, select and move objects around in your drawings.

The Align and distribute dialog now has the ability to arrange objects along a circle with the new polar arrange feature.

The Align and Distribute Dialog now has the ability to exchange position of selected objects. It adds the ability to exchange the positions of the objects that the artist has selected. So you can select several objects in your drawing, and then simply swap their positions with each other:

Swap-objects

It is also now easier to select multiple objects with the same properties in Inkscape with the select same feature. This allows the user to select all the objects in the drawing with the same fill or stroke color:

Selectsame

 

There are also many, many more new features and updates to Inkscape, so be sure to check out the Release Notes for more details.

Getting it for Fedora

At the moment, this new release of Inkscape is not yet available in the Fedora Repos, but should be appearing there soon. When it is available, you will be able to get it via the Software application or via the command line with:

sudo yum install inkscape

If you can’t wait for the update to hit the repos, you can always update from updates-testing or install the package from koji.

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FESCo Elections Interview with Debarshi Ray (rishi) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-debarshi-ray-rishi/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-debarshi-ray-rishi/#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:18:14 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6898 This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.

Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on January 26th and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on February 3rd.

Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.

Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Debarshi Ray (rishi)

rishi

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

You can find a summary at http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/User:Rishi

If you want details about my GNOME activity, then I work on our online accounts stack – its various underpinnings and the applications involved (includes nautilus, gvfs, gnome-documents, gnome-control-center, etc.). I also work on gnome-terminal and tracker.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

Time-based. Having a predictable release schedule is very important in
my opinion.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

I think that the way we push updates to our users needs to be improved, and there are a few relatively simple things that we can do in this area. We spend a lot of effort making sure that our releases are of the highest quality, but then we barely do anything to ensure the quality of the updates being pushed out to a stable releases. This often leads to surprises (or regressions) and annoyances (too many updates).

We should stop the practice of pushing out updates asynchronously, unless they have security implications. We should push them out monthly or fortnightly to updates-testing so that testers get a chance to QA a well defined combination of packages, instead of a constantly moving set, which is the case now. This is not different from the system of

freezes that are used to QA our releases.

We should have a few people auditing updates, and a strict set of guidelines on what is allowed in a stable release. I believe this is the case in Debian and Ubuntu. Fedora releases are already short-lived (as compared to RHEL or CentOS) to begin with so there is no need to introduce significant UI or code changes and lead to the problems mentioned in the previous paragraph.

A more intrusive improvement would be the ability to roll back updates.

Finally, we should start looking at sandboxing and application bundles that GNOME has been working on. A well-packaged distribution will always have its strengths, but sandboxing and bundles solve an important problem. We should explore how we can leverage them to our advantage.

Care to share a screenshot of your Fedora desktop?

fedora-22

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

Outside Fedora I am a GNOME developer working on our online accounts story. Recently GNOME has been playing a pioneering role in the way we look at GNU/Linux desktop applications

I believe this gives me a good background to improve Fedora Workstation as an end-user facing (or client-side) operating system.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

Historically, the people behind Fedora’s desktop spin had felt a certain amount of disconnect with FESCo. This was fueled by lack of communication between people on both sides of the divide, and something that we should avoid.

I would expect FESCo members to reach out to the various technical stakeholders in the project (eg., WGs, spins, feature owners) to better understand what they are trying to achieve. This can happen on public mailing lists and IRC, or via private conversations over email and hallway tracks at conferences.

Committee members can shape the overall direction of the project by blogging and presenting at conferences on matters that they think are of strategic importance to Fedora.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

Sitting on FESCo would help me guide Fedora, and particularly Workstation, towards a better application and updates story. While I can contribute towards the same objectives as an individual, some aspects require broad project wide changes and being a FESCo member would help in realizing them.

What degree of leeway do you feel that the Working Groups should have to diverge from one another in establishing their own identity?

The Working Groups are the ones who should be in charge of defining their product and be allowed to diverge from one another as long as it is not to the disadvantage of another product or WG.

How would you define the set of criteria for promoting a spin to a product? What about the reverse?

Products define the project. Each of them should be focused on a broad area that is strategic to the project. Currently our products are Workstation, Server and Cloud, which means that Fedora is focused on building operating systems for laptops / desktops, servers and cloud deployments.
For a spin to be promoted:

  1.  It should be sufficiently different from an existing product. Different enough that its objectives and needs are not and can not be addressed by one of the existing products. eg., entirely different target audience, different release schedules, different installation or release medium, , etc..
  2. Should be able to have a strong identity of its own, without hampering any of the existing products. Also see (1).
  3. A group behind it with a proven track record.

Similarly, I would demote a product if it no longer makes sense to have it as one of the flagships of the project:

  1. Fall in quality of what is being delivered.
  2. Target area is no longer strategic for the project. eg., if people stop using client-side operating systems, it will not make sense to have Workstation as a product.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

FESCo is about overseeing the technical issues faced by the project, while the Council is more strategic. It is responsible for Fedora’s governance, budget and outreach. This is quite obvious from looking at the current composition of the Council. It has people with background in outreach, engineering, program management, and our fearless leader.

Therefore I don’t see any conflict of interest here.

How “closely” do you, as a member of FESCO, follow the devel mailing list before voting on FESCO meetings? In other words, apart from your own technical qualifications, what is your typical process in arriving at decisions?

I have never been on FESCo before, so I can not say how I voted in previous FESCo meetings. If I am elected, I would try to inform myself by not only following devel@lists.fp.o, but more importantly, talking to the individual stake holders and understanding the technical issues being voted upon. Attending conferences and making myself accessible to people would help in this area.

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FESCo Elections Interview with Parag Nemade (paragan) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-parag-nemade-paragan/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-parag-nemade-paragan/#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:17:44 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6891 This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.

Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on January 26th and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on February 3rd.

Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.

Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Parag Nemade (paragan)

Parag Nemade

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I am using Fedora since its first release Fedora Core 1. I joined Fedora as a contributor in Fedora Core 6 development cycle. I have contributed many Internationalization(i18n) packages and sponsored some people in Fedora. I have done more than 1600 package reviews in Fedora. I am also a provenpackager and helped in fixing packages in mass-rebuilds. I also contributed to few packaging guidelines draft.

Currently I do package reviews, sponsor people in packager group, add new style, new language script fonts in Fedora, maintain some i18n packages. Other than that I like Fedora Applications. Whenever there is any new Fedora Application(like tagger, pkgdb2, fmn) is available or any of its new release, I used to test it and if found any issues, report it upstream. I also test packages in updates-testing and provide feedback in bodhi.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

It should be compromise. Accept Changes that will be ready to be tested by Alpha release and follow the release schedule deadlines.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

We need to have more testing for Fedora Products and resolve any issues in
them. I see we still have some installer, package selection, using dnf instead
yum, migration to python3, installing non-default groups in any product issues
going on. For some of these issues users need to be aware of these changes in
advance by providing them some examples on how the changes will affect them and how can they will fix them otherwise their packages remain incompatible in the current development cycle. Everytime such big change comes we end up with filing mass bugs, fixing most of the release blockers but not fully resolve all such bugs. Over the last few releases I saw such leftover bugs remained still open.
We should make sure to fix them all.

If we look the development happened in last few releases we can see we got many
features/changes development happened in Fedora but all this is not getting properly documented on Fedora wiki. We also need more test cases to be submitted with each Change proposal that people can test on test days. Translations is another thing. Every release we see some translations missed by some packages in Fedora. Sometimes anaconda installer too miss to pull translations. We need developers to also make sure that they will check translation coverage to be 100% for the packages getting tagged in final releases. We need more QA, automation to avoid any last minute schedule slip.

We also occasionally find new contributors asking questions about packager sponsorship. We have been regularly amending the sponsorship guidelines but still
there are some questions not answered in guidelines and left to individual sponsor
to define. Lack of sponsor for new contributors or lack of response from submitter
is one problem. The merge-reviews is another problem that could have easily solved by asking that package group/SIG members to finish those reviews in any
Fedora release cycle. But no particular decision on this happened yet.

Care to share a screenshot of your Fedora desktop?

I use Gnome as my primary desktop environment.

MyDesktop

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

In the free time I read about mobile technology related articles. I do testing of custom Android ROM’s for my old mobile and provide feedback to its developers. I don’t think this will help me in my FESCo role.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

FESCo is definitely doing good work. Its weekly meeting logs are always posted on devel list so that contributors can know what is happening in FESCo meetings. But the tickets getting reported to FESCo are not getting lower and the queue is always filled with good number of tickets for each meeting and for future meetings. We need more hands to help FESCo in their work. That does not mean more seats to FESCo but more volunteers to either participate in FESCo meetings to share their views on tickets or on mailing list.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

As a contributor to Fedora I can always provide my views on topics in FESCo meetings but as part of FESCo I will try to have Fedora development going forward in the required right direction by providing my vote.

What degree of leeway do you feel that the Working Groups should have to diverge from one another in establishing their own identity?

The different Working Groups should use the same existing infrastructure, packages in Fedora. However they can diverge by using certain required features that is necessary for establishing their own identity. I think the per-product configuration will be helpful on how this divergence can be implemented.

How would you define the set of criteria for promoting a spin to a product? What about the reverse?

I think spins should continue to stay like we have them currently and I don’t think we need to increase our products also. If possible we should work on integrating some spins in our products. The current 3 products are good. The Workstation product uses Gnome desktop environment. The other desktop environment spins can use the similar PRD to promote them as a product. But, we need to find names for those products then. I don’t think we need to go reverse now for already defined products.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

I think it’s significance will remain the same. FESCo has been looking into the Working Group’s discussions then the issues like Change discussions, some package development problems, non-responsive maintainers and provenpackager requests. The Fedora Council is not supposed to this work and is a high level decision making governance body.

How “closely” do you, as a member of FESCO, follow the devel mailing list before voting on FESCO meetings? In other words, apart from your own technical qualifications, what is your typical process in arriving at decisions?

Sometimes the discussion on some topic receives many replies on the devel list within a day which takes some time to read and understand what users have to say. But, I will make sure I get enough information about the topic on which voting is going to happen. Before FESCo meeting, I will read the tickets given in agenda, try to reproduce the problem and if I can find some information related to that ticket then I will collect it. Based on this information I can decide to vote.

Anything else voters should know?

I work for Red Hat Internationalization team. All other information is already
covered in other answers.

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FESCo Elections Interview with Tomas Hozza (thozza) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-tomas-hozza-thozza/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-tomas-hozza-thozza/#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:17:17 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6861 This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.

Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on January 26th and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on February 3rd.

Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.

Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Tomas Hozza (thozza)

Tomas Hozza

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

Proud daily user of Fedora!
Fedora contributor and package maintainer since 2012. Working mainly on network related daemons and clients. Most notably BIND, ISC DHCP (in the past), wget, dnsmasq… Currently focused on DNSSEC and DNS related things.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

I think it should be a compromise. Since Fedora is a cutting edge distribution it should have some latest features in each new release. On the other hand there has to be some schedule for the release, because without it it would be just chaos. I think the compromise should be outcome of the plans for the next release and fedora community discussions.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

Automated tests coverage for Fedora updates and rawhide especially. Detecting issues causing breakage of compose building early enough before release freezes. Way how to efficiently mass-rebuild packages for some System-Wide Changes.

Care to share a screenshot of your Fedora desktop?

Sure… Not much to see though;-).

Screenshot of desktop

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

Working with different upstream communities. It helps to accept other people opinions if they are better. Also helping to understand how to work with people to towards some compromise/agreement.

Other than that I like to play with Arduino hardware. Since I’m using Fedora for that I helps to see the missing pieces in the distro to be even more attractive for Arduino developers.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

I think that the community may feel like FESCo is not communicating that well. However I think that every time some information is missing or some important thing is discussed, it is forwarded to devel list (or some other more appropriate list) for discussion before any decision is made.

FESCo doesn’t want to make non-informed decisions and want the community to be well informed. In the end FESCo is representing the community in the decision making process.

There is one thing that could be done better. I think the FESCo meetings could be advertised in a way, that community members should definitely attend them and express their reasons/motivation/point of view when needed. Though, it is already being done in some way.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

Contribute to the decision making process. Otherwise I think any contributor has the same possibilities as a FESCo member has, like attend FESCo meetings, contribute to the discussion, make FESCo aware of things it should be and was not, etc.

What degree of leeway do you feel that the Working Groups should have to diverge from one another in establishing their own identity?

To the point of not affecting another WG/Product in a negative way. I think it is important to expect and grant some freedom to WGs, since each one of them is trying to fulfill different users expectations.

How would you define the set of criteria for promoting a spin to a product? What about the reverse?

The ability to drive all the changes specific to the spin in time to comply with the release schedule should be one of the criteria. Also the ability to prove that the target audience is large enough (may be hard to define) for the spin to be a full product. Also the community behind such initiative should be large enough, so it can continue also if some individual contributor decides to stop working on it.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

I think FESCo’s role is to discuss and make decisions on day-to-day engineering questions and issues.

How “closely” do you, as a member of FESCO, follow the devel mailing list before voting on FESCO meetings? In other words, apart from your own technical qualifications, what is your typical process in arriving at decisions?

I’m going through the devel list daily and I’m trying to follow the discussion as much as possible. I think that the member’s technical background is not enough to make decisions.

My typical work-flow is to go through the planned FESCo tickets discussion (in the ticket itself) before the meeting, while keeping track of the discussion every day (in the ticket and on the devel
list). However with some controversial changes/issues it is sometimes hard to follow the discussion due to giant load of emails.

I think that the involved parties should be invited to the FESCo meeting, when discussing something they are interested in, to clarify things if needed.

Anything else voters should know?

I’m not aware of any, but don’t be afraid to ask;-).

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FESCo Elections Interview with David King (amigadave) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-david-king-amigadave/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-david-king-amigadave/#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:16:46 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6903 This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.

Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on January 26th and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on February 3rd.

Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.

Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with David King (amigadave)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I work for Red Hat on Fedora Workstation, and maintain several packages in Fedora, as well as several MinGW packages in my spare time.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

Fedora is already a compromise of time- and feature-based releasing, with the regular slippage around scheduled releases. It would be nice if the slippage was less common, but with so many people and moving parts, it is a challenge.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

The product split which happened recently is still in progress, and each product will likely test the limits of what level of differentiation is possible.

Care to share a screenshot of your Fedora desktop?

There are some good screenshots of GNOME on http://www.gnome.org/

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I contribute to GNOME, maintaining several modules including Cheese and Logs. I also maintain EasyTAG, as well as helping out in the GNOME documentation team. In terms of technical experience, I think that I have a broad enough experience to make useful contributions to FESCo.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

There is already the meetings, the minutes of those and the members are also active on IRC, so I think that FESCo does quite well already.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

Voting at FESCo meetings on matters of interest to FESCo, which can broadly be summarised as “steering the technical direction of Fedora”.

What degree of leeway do you feel that the Working Groups should have to diverge from one another in establishing their own identity?

I think that the Working Groups have made some reasonable decisions on diverging configurations so far, such as for firewalld configuration in Workstation. If there is a question about a specific engineering
decision regarding divergence, that is something that FESCo could answer, if necessary.

How would you define the set of criteria for promoting a spin to a product? What about the reverse?

What makes a Fedora product was defined by the Fedora Board in 2014:
https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora.next#What_makes_a_.22product.22.3F

A spin would have to fulfil those criteria if it wanted to be promoted to a product (and stop fulfilling them for the reverse to happen).

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

FESCo was and is responsible for steering the technical direction of the project, which has not changed with the advent of the Fedora Council.

How “closely” do you, as a member of FESCO, follow the devel mailing list before voting on FESCO meetings? In other words, apart from your own technical qualifications, what is your typical process in arriving at decisions?

I am not a member of FESCo, but I am subscribed to devel, and read the mailing list. I would guess that it is fairly typical that FESCo members try to understand the topics on the meeting agenda by reading up on the topic beforehand, as well as discussing with the involved parties.

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FESCo Elections Interview with Kevin Fenzi (nirik) http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-kevin-fenzi-nirik/ http://fedoramagazine.org/fesco-elections-interview-with-kevin-fenzi-nirik/#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:16:40 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6902 This is a part of FESCo Elections interviews series.

Voting is open to all Fedora contributors. The elections started on January 26th and closes promptly at 23:59 UTC on February 3rd.

Please read the responses from candidates and make your choices carefully.

Feel free to ask questions of the candidates here or elsewhere!

Interview with Kevin Fenzi (nirik)

What is your background in Fedora? What have you worked on and what are you doing now?

I started out in 2005 maintaining the Xfce desktop packages for Fedora Extras, then served on the Fedora Extras Steering Committee, then FESCo after Fedora Core and Extras Merged. I’ve been active in contributing to Fedora Infrastructure for many years, and now am employed by Red Hat to lead Fedora Infrastructure. I also contribute to Release Engineering and maintain a bunch of packages.

Do you think Fedora should be time based or more feature driven distribution? Or compromise?

I am in general in favor of time based with some fudge factor for features. Scheduling a slightly longer cycle when we know there’s big features trying to land shouldn’t be a problem, but if they cause the cycle to be too long, we should really push them to the next release.

What are the most pressing issues facing Fedora today (from engineering POV)? What should we do about them?

I think we need to work on our sponsorship/on-boarding process for new packagers, it’s frustrating for some new contributors. Of course we shouldn’t sacrifice quality, nor do I think we need to.

I think we need a better way to make mass changes accross our collection of packages (ie, for some spec change). This would take people willing to create tools and data.

Care to share a screenshot of your Fedora desktop?

I always find it a bit puzzling why people like screenshots. I use both Gnome and Xfce here (usually alternating at each boot or so), and with both of them my usual setup calls for most everything to be maximized. So, a screen shot would show you… my hexchat window, or my claws-mail window, or my midori window. It’s not really very exciting. :)
That said, here’s a shot of my xfce desktop with a terminal:

Screenshot

What are your interests and experience outside of Fedora? What of those things will help you in this role?

I brew beer and mead. That helps you take time and carefully measure and handle ingredients. I think that sort of thing is important in Fedora too. Take your time and do things right.

How can FESCo do a better job communicating with the rest of the Fedora community, or do you feel that FESCo is already doing well here?

One thing that leaps to mind is if we had someone like mizmo to do blog posts for each of our meetings. That would make them more accessible to everyone than a dry irc log.

Also, I think currently we kind of do a poor job of expressing our opinions on the devel list on topics before meetings. I can understand reasons why, (lack of time, someone else already stated the position we agree with so why add a me too, proposal has been mention 100 times and shot down before so why reply now, etc), but it might still be good to try and post more about reasoning to the devel list.

What can you accomplish as part of FESCo that you couldn’t accomplish as a contributor to Fedora without sitting on FESCo?

Guide Fedora to the right decisions based on past history and doing things right.

What degree of leeway do you feel that the Working Groups should have to diverge from one another in establishing their own identity?

I’m happy trusting the working groups to make sensible decisions and have leeway, but it’s really hard to answer this without more concrete information.

For example, I am strongly against creating multiple Fedora distributions, so I would object to working groups doing that.

How would you define the set of criteria for promoting a spin to a product? What about the reverse?

I’m not sure there’s a direct hierarchical relationship between spins and products.

Any new product I would like to see: serves some area no existing product does, has a vibrant upstream and Fedora communities working on it, and is in line with our other values.

With the advent of Fedora Council now, what do you see as the significance of FESCO in Fedora project?

FESCo I see continuing to guide the technical day to day workings of Fedora, the package collection, etc.

I expect the Council to try and work on longer term goals, etc.

How “closely” do you, as a member of FESCO, follow the devel mailing list before voting on FESCO meetings?

As the only real active moderator of the devel list, I read every single post. Of course some posts could come in while I am busy or during the meeting, but I am always caught up the day of the meetings.

In other words, apart from your own technical qualifications, what is your typical process in arriving at decisions?

I think my approach is likely very similar to any other logical person: I try and gather as much information as I can from stakeholders, I look at the code or other technical data and come to a conclusion based on all that. I’ve surely been wrong in the past, and I am sure I will be again, but we are each only human and do the best we can. :)

Anything else voters should know?

Make sure you vote! Even if you don’t wish to vote for me, or even if you want to vote against me, make your voice heard. :)

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Conferences! (FOSDEM, DevConf, SCALE, Flock 2015, FUDCon), updates bug, and the Fedora start page http://fedoramagazine.org/5tftw-2015-01-28/ http://fedoramagazine.org/5tftw-2015-01-28/#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:03:00 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6882 Fedora is a big project, and it’s hard to keep up with everything that goes on. This series highlights interesting happenings in five different areas every week. It isn’t comprehensive news coverage — just quick summaries with links to each. Here are the five things for January 28th, 2014:

February Conferences: FOSDEM 2015, DevConf.cz, SCALE 13x

There are several conferences with a big Fedora presence in the next month.

First up, FOSDEM, on January 31st and February 1st. Originally, the name stood for Free and Open Source Developers’ European Meeting, but as far as far as I can tell it’s really just stand-alone word, now — although the conference does have a strong developer audience. I’ll be speaking on Sunday in the distributions devroom (filling in for Stephen Gallagher, who couldn’t make the trip this year). There will also be a Fedora booth — I’ll see many of you there!

The following week, it’s DevConf.cz, a free conference organized by Red Hat Czech Republic. Sunday (February 8) is dedicated to Fedora and CentOS — check the schedule and join us (and about 1000 other sysadmins and developers) if you’re in the area. (Brno is easy to get to from Vienna or Prague.)

And then, almost halfway around the world, SCALE 13x in Los Angeles, California, from February 19-22. On Thursday, there will be a general Fedora Activity Day, and another one focused on Project Atomic and Fedora Cloud on Sunday. There are many talks from Fedora contributors: maker extraordinaire Ruth Suehle will be presenting the Sunday keynote, Brockmeier has a talk about solving packaging, or making it worse, Tom Callaway will explain FOSS licenses for non-lawyers, Ian McLeod gets into release engineering (or how the distribution sausage is made), and at the very end of it all I’ve got a talk on Fedora.next (so, save some energy and don’t take off too early)! Let me know if I’ve missed anyone’s talk — it’s a huge schedule with a lot to do, and looks to be a great conference overall.

Offline Updates Bug

If you’ve been experiencing problems installing updates via GNOME Software, or with Apper in KDE, please read this guide to solving the F21 software update glitch. Unfortunately for GUI-only users, it requires a few manual steps at the command line, but it’s not very complicated and you should be back to having a securely-updated system in no time.

Flock Dates!

Every year, we hold a big contributor-oriented conference, Flock. This alternates between Europe and North America, and this year, it will be in Rochester, New York. More details to come, but we have the dates and venue: August 12-15 at the Hyatt Regency Rochester. Hope to see you there!

FUDCon Pune

In addition to Flock, we also run several other Fedora premiere events, including FUDCons — that is, Fedora Users and Developers Conferences — in Asia/Pacific and Latan America (or, APAC and LATAM). While Flock focuses on project development and planning, FUDCon is a more general showcase for both contributors and end-users hoping to learn more. We’ve just announced the location of this year’s APAC FUDCon — Pune, India in June.

New Start Page

If you’re reading this on Fedora Magazine, you may have come here from the new Fedora Start Page, and in the past week you may have noticed a nice new look for that. Thanks to the Fedora Websites team and particularly to Robert Mayr (a.k.a. “robyduck”) for work on this.

Meanwhile, though, as people’s use of the Internet and web sites evolves, browser designers have deemphasized the idea of a portal-like “home page”. One of my focuses as Fedora Project Leader is increasing connectivity and communication across the project — that’s a reason I write 5tFTW, for example. This start page, common to most of the web browsers we ship as a default for new users, is one of the few ways we have for bringing everyone together to a common online space. The mailing lists are another, of course (with devel, test, and users serving as the biggest “hubs”), but not everyone likes to subscribe to lists, and no one has time to keep up with all that. And for very active contributors, IRC is a constant connection — but for most users and casual contributors, we don’t really have much else.

So, as this evolves to the next version, where start pages will be less and less prominent, how can we bring useful, dynamic news, features, and help to our whole community without being out-of-sight, out-of-mind — or overly pushy — all with a shoestring budget? What are your ideas?

Postscript

Sorry about missing 5tFTW last week. I’d planned to wrap it up on Friday, and then my kid brought home a very dramatic stomach bug, and I spent the day… let’s just say… graphically indisposed. Better now, and mostly dug out from the blizzard….


 

5tftw-large

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Worried about GHOST? Don’t be, on supported Fedora versions. http://fedoramagazine.org/worried-about-ghost-dont-be-on-supported-fedora-versions/ http://fedoramagazine.org/worried-about-ghost-dont-be-on-supported-fedora-versions/#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 00:20:06 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6877 There’s a quite serious security vulnerability making the news today (ZDNet, Ars Technica), CVE-2015-0235, nicknamed “GHOST”. It happens that this flaw was fixed in glibc-2.18 (but quietly, and the full implications don’t seem to have been widely noticed). That means that Fedora 20 and Fedora 21 are not vulnerable to this problem, because they shipped with newer versions than that — but note that Fedora 19 and before are. If you are running an old release, and haven’t yet gotten around to updating, this is an excellent time to do so.

(If you’re running one of our downstream distributions, or are just curious, see Red Hat’s security advisory for CVE-2015-0235 for RHEL.)

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India Calling – Namaste FUDCon APAC 2015 http://fedoramagazine.org/india-calling-namaste-fudcon-apac-2015/ http://fedoramagazine.org/india-calling-namaste-fudcon-apac-2015/#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 14:25:42 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6858 I am extremely pleased to announce that the FUDCon APAC 2015 will be hosted in Pune, India. There was a bid from Pune, India and PhnomPenh, Cambodia. After a lot of discussion, Pune, India has been given an opportunity to be the host for FUDCon APAC 2015.

For the curious homosapiens, FUDCon is the Fedora Users and Developers Conference: a major free & open source software event held  in various regions around the world, twice annually.  FUDCon is a great combination of sessions, talks, workshops, and hackfests and it is always free to attend for anyone in the world.

For the FUDCon Pune, we are expecting varied and interesting talks and presence of large numbers of contributors. Like last year, 2015 will also be a great year of events for the Fedora Community. We expect FUDCon Pune to be a productive event for the local and global community.

As we all know, the price of success is hard work, so our organizing committee in Pune is already working sedulously and going the extra mile to make the event successful.

So Fedorians , get ready to be part of one of the largest and most productive events of Fedora. I will post CFP dates and link soon. Stay tuned.. :)

Here is important & useful information for FUDCon Pune,2015 India:
Time: 26 – 28 June 2015
Venue: MIT College of Engineering , Pune, India
Details: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/FUDCon:Bid_for_Pune_2015
MOM: http://piratepad.net/FUDConPune2015

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Special update information for Fedora 21 users: PackageKit errors http://fedoramagazine.org/special-update-information-for-fedora-21-users-packagekit-errors/ http://fedoramagazine.org/special-update-information-for-fedora-21-users-packagekit-errors/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 00:21:27 +0000 http://fedoramagazine.org/?p=6741 We have found some bugs in PackageKit and related components which require an update to fix. Unfortunately, the bugs can prevent Fedora Workstation’s default update mechanism – the ‘offline update’ system, where a notification of new updates appears, and you reboot to install them – from working correctly. The bugs can also cause problems with software installation and/or removal when using GNOME Software or Apper (the KDE software manager).

If you have tried to do an offline update recently, you may have seen a notification that it failed.

If you usually apply system updates using the ‘offline update’ mechanism or another PackageKit-based application, then to resolve this problem, we recommend that you run the following
command with root privileges:

yum update --advisory=FEDORA-2015-0921

To do this, for instance, if you are an admin user, you can run:

sudo yum update --advisory=FEDORA-2015-0921

Or if you have the root password, you can run:

su -c 'yum update --advisory=FEDORA-2015-0921'

either way, a few packages including PackageKit and libhif should be updated. You may then wish to reboot the system (though in most cases it should not be necessary).

Usually, this should be sufficient to resolve the bugs in question, and you can then do future system updates using the ‘offline update’ system. If you continue to have problems, you should run this command:

pkcon repair

and then reboot the system. If you still have problems after this, please file a bug report.

We do sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused by these bugs.

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